re-work of double creek II, aspen creek & pink rocks / by Philip Tarlow

3:53 PM: as my vision shifts, i’m updating older motion paintings that now seem too heavy and overloaded to my eye. aspen creek is certainly the first that struck me as i gazed around the studio this morning. while it was certainly a good painting, it seemed heavy handed when i compared it with what i’ve done over the past week or so.

aspen creek, 17 1/2x 68” post-revision

aspen creek BEFORE REVISIONS

next came pink rocks and double creek II. i’ll talk more about these after our afternoon creek walk.

i shot this a few hours ago while walking uo north crestone creek

PINK ROCKS: back from our walk, i can now give my thoughts on the work i did today. emboldended by what i’m reading in the matisse in morocco catalogue, i feel permission, as if i needed it, to take a series of shapes based upon natural forms and spin them out into endless configurations, endless combinations of colors and compositional variations. during our walk this afternoon i shot photos of the creek, which will give me more material. as well, tomorrow, weather permitting, i plan on going out to the creek for my first plein air session of the year. and i’m so curious to see what i do. instead of bringing my gouache colors, as i usually do, for starters i plan on bringing my colored pencils and a drawing pad. that will allow me to leave the heavy portable easel behind and thus be a lot more mobile.

BELOW: pink rocks. the rocks you see in the photo, above right, have been formed over eons, and bear witness to this process, which of course is ongoing. every mark; every subtle variation in color; every shape bear witness to the journey each individual rock has taken. they now find themselves bathed in an endless stream of pure mountain water. soon, the snowmelt will commence and many of them you see in this photo will have dissapeared beneath the rush of cascading water. they revel, i imagine, in this full body massage, which will last well into the month of may. some of them, the lighter ones, will find new resting places, giving them a new perspective